Virtual Trips: Finding a Setting for Andromeda’s Fall

I have always been a mountain girl. Born in Colorado, raised in Texas, but visiting the Rocky Mountains every summer. I could spend the rest of my days in the mountains and be a happy girl. (The beach not so much). It’s this love for the mountains which inspired me to set my first book, Blue Violet, in Estes Park. When deciding on where to set Andromeda’s Fall – book #1 of the Shadowcat Nation series – it was a no brainer.

The series is centered on a community of mountain lion shifters. I wanted to be authentic to the animals my shifters become. Mountain lions (also called cougars or pumas) have a very wide range and a variety of natural environments where they thrive. So all that did was narrow things down to the Western Hemisphere. However, one of the more common environments for these amazing creatures are the mountainous regions of the western United States. Mountains? SOLD!

Next question? Where? There are a lot of mountain ranges in that space. Since I’d already placed one series in the Rockies, I decided against that. I could easily have decided on closer to my current home in northern California where cougars do live (in fact one has been sighted in my very suburban neighborhood several times this summer). However, for my purposes I needed wider spaces of low to no human population. Time to pull out Google.

I love the internet! It allows authors like me to discover settings and virtually travel to those settings. Would I prefer to go visit and experience for myself? Absolutely. It would be tremendous in helping me write the world I’m describing more vividly. But you gotta have cash for that. So until I’m world-famous, virtual travel is my best method.

In this case, the internet helped me find all sorts of information. I concentrated on the western U.S. and looked at the following (I added links to some of my websites below in case you’re interested):

  • locations of mountain ranges
  • population heat maps over those ranges
  • proximity of large cities to small towns to wilderness
  • cougar population and ranges
  • wolf population and ranges (that’s one of my bad guys in this series – wolf shifters)
  • images of the areas
  • any blogs that the images would lead me too – frequently resulting in helpful descriptions
Based on my research I narrowed my setting down to the Bitterroot Mountain Range that follows the Idaho/Montana border. Technically they’re a subrange of the Rocky Mountains, so something I’m still familiar with, but different. It is one of the largest designated wilderness areas in the United States with extremely low populations anywhere close. Perfect! In my books, the Keller Dare compound is located on the Idaho side of the range on the northeast side of the state near the “notch” in the border.
I have always heard that the mountains of Idaho and Montana were gorgeous and they are on my list to visit. It’s a wild, gorgeous, dangerous, changing land that suits my mountain lion shifters perfectly. I hope to explore it myself some day!Andromeda’s Fall coming soon through The Wild Rose Press! (Date TBD)
 
 
A few of my research links for Idaho and the Bitterroot Range:

2 comments

  1. That is a fabulous place!!!! Perfect!! Didn't make it to the Bitterroot mts this summer but did get to Idaho again and it is a gorgeous state! MAybe next summer but it seems I can get there in your books!!! That is great!

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s